Extinct in the wild

    Definition of extinct

    The criteria for declaring a species as extinct in the wild are if:

    • there have been thorough searches conducted for the wildlife; and
    • the wildlife has not been seen in the wild over a period that is appropriate for the life cycle or form of the wildlife.

    The Governor in Council may classify a species as extinct in the wild by amending the Nature Conservation (Wildlife) Regulation 2006 where the above criteria under the Nature Conservation Act 1992 have been met.

    A species is extinct in the wild when it is known only to survive in cultivation, in captivity or as a naturalised population well outside the past range (that is, the species survives, reproduces and persists in an area where it did not naturally occur). A species is presumed as extinct in the wild when exhaustive surveys in known and/or expected habitat - at appropriate times throughout its historic range - have failed to record an individual. Surveys must be conducted over a timeframe appropriate to the species’ life cycle and life form.

    Extinction is irreversible and occurs when a species or other group of organisms has no living representatives in the wild.

    View a list of extinct in the wild animals and plants in Queensland.

    Extinct in the wild animals

    The following animals are listed as extinct in the wild under the Nature Conservation Act 1992:

    Common name Scientific name
    Bramble Cay melomys Melomys rubicola 
    Burrowing bettong Bettongia lesueur graii 
    Darling Downs hopping-mouse Notomys mordax
    Desert rat-kangaroo Caloprymnus campestris
    Eastern bettong Bettongia gaimardi gaimardi
    Paradise parrot Psephotus pulcherrimus
    Percy Island flying-fox (also known as dusky flying-fox) Pteropus brunneus
    Sharp snouted dayfrog Taudactylus acutirostris
    Southern dayfrog Taudactylus diurnus
    Southern gastric brooding frog Rheobatrachus silus
    Western quoll Dasyurus geoffroii
    White-footed rabbit-rat (also known as white-footed tree-rat) Conilurus albipes

    Extinct in the wild plants

    There are 22 species of plants that are listed as extinct in the wild under the Nature Conservation Act 1992.

    The complete list of extinct in the wild plants can be found in the Nature Conservation (Wildlife) Regulation 2006.

    Causes of extinction

    The criteria for declaring a species as extinct in the wild are if:

    • there have been thorough searches conducted for the wildlife; and
    • the wildlife has not been seen in the wild over a period that is appropriate for the life cycle or form of the wildlife.

    The Governor in Council may classify a species as extinct in the wild by amending the Nature Conservation (Wildlife) Regulation 2006 where the above criteria under the Nature Conservation Act 1992 have been met.

    A species is extinct in the wild when it is known only to survive in cultivation, in captivity or as a naturalised population well outside the past range (that is, the species survives, reproduces and persists in an area where it did not naturally occur). A species is presumed as extinct in the wild when exhaustive surveys in known and/or expected habitat - at appropriate times throughout its historic range - have failed to record an individual. Surveys must be conducted over a timeframe appropriate to the species’ life cycle and life form.

    Extinction is irreversible and occurs when a species or other group of organisms has no living representatives in the wild.

    View a list of extinct in the wild animals and plants in Queensland.