Crocodile management

Image of a crocodile beside water.

The Queensland Government is committed to a crocodile management program that delivers appropriate protection of public safety while enabling the ongoing survival of crocodiles in the wild.

If you live in or are visiting Croc Country, it is your responsibility to be Croc Wise and aware of the different levels of risk so you can make informed decisions, for example, when considering entering the water.

Queensland Crocodile Management Plan

The Queensland Crocodile Management Plan (QCMP) (PDF, 2.1MB) is the overarching framework for the statewide management of public safety risks associated with crocodiles in Queensland. Management is based on crocodile management zones where crocodiles are removed in certain circumstances across different areas of the state in accordance with the level of risk posed.

The QCMP has six zones (A to F) that apply throughout Queensland. The location of each zone is detailed in the zone maps.

One of the benefits of the QCMP is that it provides greater information on the risks posed by crocodiles in each zone, how crocodiles are intended to be managed by the department in each zone, and the key Crocwise behaviours community members can practise to minimise the risk of crocodile attacks within each zone.

Crocodile management zones

Zone A

Barrier and removal zone

A ‘barrier and removal zone’ is suited to areas where there are physical barriers that are generally effective in preventing crocodiles from entering the area. This applies, for example, to Aplins Weir in Townsville in the dry season. Any crocodile in this area is targeted for removal, regardless of size or behaviour.

Zone B

Active removal zone

An ‘active removal zone’ is suited to areas of rivers, creeks and wetlands where crocodiles are frequently in close proximity to large urban populations. All crocodiles, regardless of size or behaviour are targeted for removal.

Zone C

Targeted management zone

A ‘targeted management zone’ is suited to areas that are frequented by large numbers of people, due to being near an urban centre or popular swimming areas and are also frequented by crocodiles. Crocodiles 2 metres or greater in length and crocodiles displaying dangerous behaviour are targeted for removal.

Zone D

Transitory zone

A ‘transitory zone’ is suited to areas where crocodiles are often seen passing through but are not core habitat, such as beaches. Crocodiles 2 metres or greater in length and any crocodiles displaying dangerous behaviour are targeted for removal. Note that it is generally very difficult to remove crocodiles from open water.

Zone E

General management zone

A ‘general management zone’ is suited to areas that are typical habitat for crocodiles but are not near a large urban centre, as well as other areas with varied crocodile numbers that are not otherwise zoned. Essentially, this zone covers the remainder of Croc Country which is defined as the area north of the Boyne River, near Gladstone. Crocodiles displaying dangerous behaviour are targeted for removal.

Zone F

Atypical habitat zone

An ‘atypical habitat zone’ is suited to areas that are not typical habitat for crocodiles – e.g., beyond their typical southernmost extent. Areas in this zone include waterways south of the Boyne River. Any crocodile found in Zone F is automatically targeted for removal after a sighting has been confirmed, regardless of size or behaviour. This includes crocodiles in the Mary River.

Zone maps

The crocodile management zones are shown on the following crocodile management zone maps:

Why the QCMP is important

The QCMP provides a balanced approach between crocodile conservation and public safety by outlining how the Queensland Government manages crocodiles, including removal in certain circumstances, in accordance with the level of risk posed across different areas of the state.

The plan also highlights the key safety messages for residents and visitors in Croc Country.

Report

Report crocodile sightings in Queensland by using the QWildlife app for iOS, available in the App Store, and for Android, available in Google Play, or access the sighting report online or by calling 1300 130 372 (Option 1).

Remember: crocodiles are highly mobile and the longer you take to report a sighting, the less likely it is that the crocodile will be located.

Download QWildlife

Download the QWildlife app to report crocodile sightings.

Download on the App Store for iOS
Download QWildlife app for iOS in App Store

Download on Google Play for Android
Download QWildlife app for Android in Google Play